5 Buying Tips for the Budget Conscious Player

Andy | April 13, 2015 | 5 Comments
Guitar Amp Buying Tips

The mighty Fender Hot Rod Deluxe. Don’t be intimidated by the $700+ retail price tag – if you watch Craigslist closely enough, you can snag one for half that.

Everyone knows rock stars get the best of everything, including the latest (and most expensive) guitars, amps, and pedals. But you don’t have to be a pro to upgrade your equipment. Check out these five buying tips to get better gear for less $, and you’ll be well on your way to sounding like one.

1. Always buy used

This is the Golden Rule of Gear. You’ll be amazed at what you can afford if you don’t mind someone else having played it before you. Many good guitars and amps can be found on the used market for half of their retail price, leaving you much more coin to spend on other stuff. Plus chances are that the original owner had the guitar set up already or broke the amp speaker in, so that’ll save you some time and money on the back end as well.

2. Research, research, research

With the availability of product information and reviews on the Internet nowadays, this one should be easy. Read as much as you can about that piece you got your eye on, including product manuals (just Google the name of it plus ‘manual’) and reviews by established websites and magazines. Also, checking out user reviews on Amazon, Harmony Central, and other retailers helps, as they usually shed some light on not only what your guitar or amp can do, but also whether it will be useful for certain specific applications. Very cool.

Affordable Gear: The Danelectro Tuna Melt Tremolo Pedal

One of the most underrated pedals out there, the Tuna Melt offers up tasty tone for 1/3 the price of many better-known tremolo pedals. Do your homework and find one on the ‘Bay for cheap.

3. Don’t be afraid of less expensive alternatives

The saying ‘you get what you pay for’ doesn’t always apply here. The world of guitar (and other musical instruments) is very different from that of electronics or cars, in that sometimes brands that aren’t well known can put out some quality stuff. If you are looking for a specific sound, chances are that there’s something that can get you in the ballpark for less money. Just jump on eBay and search for ‘distortion pedal’ – bet you’ll find some interesting stuff you didn’t know existed. Plus, there’s the whole ’boutique’ world, where some of the best gear goes largely unnoticed by the majority. Crazy, right?

4. Know the market

This one goes hand in hand with rules 1 and 2. Say there’s a particular delay you want (assuming you couldn’t find a less expensive alternative) and you want to know what a good (used) price for it would be. Figure it out by browsing sites like The Gear Page and Craigslist to get a rough estimate of what they are going for. Also, remember that resellers like Guitar Center will typically buy a piece for approximately half of what they will sell it for, so account for that in your calculations as well.

5. Look in places you wouldn’t normally

Pawn shops and garage sales are great places to find quality gear, as they are oftentimes maintained by people who are just looking to make a sale. Plus, you can often negotiate a better price than what they are asking. Don’t be afraid to get in there and try to talk them down; after all, you know the market better than they do.

Written by Zeph Whitt.

Category: Guitar Stuff

Comments (5)

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  1. Zeph Whitt says:

    Great point, Jonny! I too, learned a similar lesson: better (for me) doesn’t always mean more expensive.

    I inherited an old $200 Daisy Rock guitar (bright pink finish!) that gets more playing time than my $1500 Les Paul, simply because it feels better to me and is much easier to play.

    Always go with what feels right and inspires you to play more, even if it’s not the top-of-the line.

  2. Paul says:

    Thanks Andy for taking the time to write this 🙂

  3. jonny says:

    Don’t by an instrument just because a renown musician performs with one. Make sure it fits you. The instruments the BigBoys use are custom made to fit them. I bought a Martin acoustic.($1100.00) I thought it felt funny,but I didn’t know any different. I was very discouraged after weeks of not getting what I really wanted out of the guitar. When I took it back,the shop owner suggested I shave the neck to fit my hand. I didn’t know that was possible. I felt like a sucker. They did the work for free,and I left a happy costumer. Everything from that day on was all up hill.My instrument and I are one now.Big Lesson #1.

  4. tom says:

    Good tips Andy.

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